Things to do and see in Brighton

There's something for everyone in Brighton, things to do and see in Brighton.

Brighton is one England's famous city known around the world either for her famous beach, Palace Pier or for her gamut of festivals. Located just within an hour south if London by train, this seaside resort is full of surprises every day. With thousands of people trooping down every day either for shopping or to partake in one of her many festivals. Popularly regarded as the happiest place to live in the United Kingdom, this city has become home to many foreigners who had either visited for tourism purposes or for shopping related purposes. Brighton over the years has grown to become one the most popular destination for conferences, trade fair, and exhibitions which have continued to pull in millions of pounds in revenue for the city. It is estimated that over four million people visit Brighton every year with about 50 million pounds spent by visitors in total.

One of the big questions you may be asking is why millions of people troop to this resort which was formerly a part of Sussex. Brighton boast of several attractions and also a reputed nightlife. Some lovely things to see in Brighton are as follow;

Brighton is home to lots of fun and attractive locations not forgetting her shopping centers and numerous markets. With less crime rate, foreigners have always chosen Brighton as a top holiday destination over the years.

Brighton Museum

Brighton Museum & Art Gallery is located in the Royal Pavilion garden, at the heart of the city’s cultural quarter. Its diverse collections bring together the arts and history to tell stories about the city and the world we live in.

Brighton Museum & Art Gallery began life in a few rooms on the upper floor of the Royal Pavilion.

The museum was opened on 5 November 1861 by Richard Owen, the founder of the Natural History Museum. Its first displays consisted of natural history specimens, the town’s art collection, and various items collected from around the world by local residents. The early museum soon outgrew the Pavilion and the town authorities made ambitious plans to create a larger and more professional museum.

Brighton Museum old photo

In 1873 Brighton Museum moved to its present site, along with the town’s public library. Although it occupies land that was formerly used as part of George IV’s stable complex, the building was built especially for the museum — indeed, it was one of the first purpose built museums in England.

In 1873 Brighton Museum moved to its present site, along with the town’s public library. Although it occupies land that was formerly used as part of George IV’s stable complex, the building was built especially for the museum — indeed, it was one of the first purpose built museums in England.

One of its founders was Henry Willett, who lent – and later donated – his collection of Popular Pottery to the museum, where it can still be seen. Willett had made his fortune in brewing, and was not only an avid collector, but a passionate supporter of museums. Willett’s example of generosity and participation has been followed with donations and legacies from many local residents over the years.

A key figure in the museum’s development was Henry Roberts, director of both Brighton’s museum and library. Under his leadership, Brighton Museum developed an international outlook, and curated exhibitions of art from many countries across Europe. His greatest success was a 1910 exhibition of French Art that featured works by Monet, Cezanne, Degas, Matisse, Gaugin and other leading artists.

 

Royal Pavilion Brighton

The Royal Pavilion is an exotic palace in the centre of Brighton with a colourful history. Built as a seaside pleasure palace for King George IV, this historic house mixes Regency grandeur with the visual style of India and China.

The Royal Pavilion has a colourful history stretching back over 200 years. Built as the seaside pleasure palace for King George IV, it has also served as a civic building, First World War hospital, and has become a true icon of Brighton.